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19 Posts authored by: tbmcouncil Employee

We are pleased to announce the third installment in our series of management summaries for the TBM eBook (Technology Business Management: How Innovative Technology Leaders Apply Business Acumen to Drive Value). Written for business technology executives and managers responsible for building or running a technology business office (or TBM program office), chapter two of the eBook describes how to build the right foundation—from defining your value proposition to understanding the roles and responsibilities that are necessary for managing your portfolios.

 

Due to the richness of chapter two, we created two separate management summaries. By reading the first management summary, readers will discover how to define a unique value proposition, deliver services aligned to that value proposition, and manage investments as a portfolio. In the second management summary, readers will learn about the foundational roles and responsibilities required to optimize value creation and delivery under TBM. These roles include:

  • Supply-side roles such as service owners and service portfolio managers, who focus on optimizing the cost and quality of our services as a means of running the business more cost-effectively.
  • Demand-side roles such as business relationship managers and business process owners, who focus on increasing the value of services to help grow and change the business through increased innovation and agility.
  • IT finance professionals, who provide the financial expertise and analysis needed for informed decision making across both supply-side and demand-side roles.

 

Feel free to share the entire eBook and any of our management summaries with others in your organization. They could be useful for the office of the CIO as well as your strategists, service managers, portfolio managers, IT and corporate finance officers, and others who have a stake in the effectiveness of your business management processes.

There are less than 90 days to go before our inaugural Technology Business Management (TBM) Conference convenes in Seattle—but who’s counting? We are! Because we’re working at a feverish pace to make sure this three-day event (November 4-7) is pure platinum for you.

 

What is the TBM Conference?

The TBM Conference will bring together Fortune 1000 CIOs, CTOs and CFOs along with their TBM office leaders to learn from executive peers who have successfully transformed their organizations with TBM. Innovative and industry-leading CIO’s tell us on a regular basis how valuable TBM is, and how it has transformed their businesses. That’s why nearly a third of all Fortune 100 companies—including Boeing, Facebook, Coca-Cola, Safeway, Target and Xerox—have embraced TBM. We’re inviting them all to attend the conference in November.

 

We’ve structured the TBM Conference with busy CIOs in mind. Day 1 is all about CIOs, and it will consist of CIO presentations and connective networking, which is always key. We know time is precious, so if you only have one day to attend this is it. Days 2 and 3 are designed to help the CIOs’ team leads learn practical lessons for building and leveraging a TBM program. Our power-packed lineup of 51 insightful speakers and panelists, includes:

  •   Rebecca Jacoby – CIO, Cisco
  •   Mike Benson –CIO, DIRECTV
  •   Tim Campos – CIO, Facebook
  •   Don Duet – Global COO, Technology Division, Goldman Sachs
  •   Chris Furst –CIO, Univision Communications
  •   Larry Godec –CIO, First American
  •   Greg Morrison –CIO, Cox Enterprises
  •   Tom Murphy – CIO, University of Pennsylvania
  •   Jim Scholefield, CTO, The Coca-Cola Company
  •   Carol Zierhoffer – CIO, Xerox
  •   Phuong Tram – CIO, DuPont

 

What will you learn?

The conference will provide practical lessons and best practices for deploying TBM within your organization. Join your peers to learn from:

  • Transformational case studies highlighting where CIO's have employed cost transparency and recovery processes (with Apptio) to drive "value" conversations with their business partners;
  • Operational case studies focusing on run-the-business optimization initiatives (such as, cost reduction, App-Rat, DC consolidation and vendor performance) and change-the-business processes (such as, demand management, investment planning and services portfolio management); and
  • Hands on Apptio sessions  learning about how to take advantage of your Apptio investment by seeing our latest innovations around data management, reporting, industry benchmarking and IT planning.

 

How can you sign up?

 

You can register for the conference by clicking here. Space is limited so register now!

We are pleased to announce the next installment in our series of management summaries of the TBM eBook (Technology Business Management: How Innovative Technology Leaders Apply Business Acumen to Drive Value). Written for business technology executives and managers responsible for building or running a technology business office (or TBM program office), chapter two describes how to build the right foundation, from how you define your value proposition to the roles and responsibilities that are necessary for managing your portfolios.

Due to the richness of chapter two, we’ve created two separate management summaries for the single chapter. By reading the first of these two, readers will discover how to:

  • Define a unique value proposition. The TBM Framework is built on a foundation that defines our technology business model, the services we provide, and the roles and responsibilities essential to optimizing value. But to define any of these, we must first define our value proposition. This is essential because the value we promise to deliver drives our technology business model and how we define our services, refines what we should expect from our TBM-related decision making, and determines what constitutes success or failure for our organizations.
  • Deliver services aligned to that value proposition. All of the “appropriate” technology business models covered by the TBM Framework dictate a services-based approach, which begins with carefully defining a portfolio of services. This is important because the services we provide and the way we deliver and support them determine our value to the business, drive our resource and skillset requirements, and dictate our cost structure.
  • Manage our investments as a portfolio. To invest in each of our technologies, services, and projects based on their contribution to business strategy, we must manage them as an investment portfolio. This requires deciding how to invest and how much to invest in each one, which is accomplished by working with business partners and other stakeholders to assess our portfolios, ask the right questions, and ultimately drive investment decisions.

Use the management summary to share these lessons with others in your organization. The summary is useful for the office of the CIO (OCIO) as well as your strategists, service managers, portfolio managers, IT and corporate finance officers, and others who have a stake in the effectiveness of your business management processes. Finally, keep an eye out for our next executive summary, covering the second part of chapter two, which dives deeper into the supply-side and demand-side roles of Technology Business Management.

We’ve gotten great feedback about the eBook, Technology Business Management: How Innovative Technology Leaders Apply Business Acumen to Drive Value, published by the Technology Business Management (TBM) Council. Many people have asked us for a more concise version that they can share with team members and colleagues. As a result, we’ve begun publishing downloadable management summaries for each chapter.

 

The first summary, available here, describes key concepts from chapter one, including the value equation of business technology and the lessons learned by innovative CIOs in adapting to powerful forces like cloud computing, consumerization, and business demand that outpaces supply. Indeed, these are the forces that have given rise to TBM.

 

Written for a diverse group of technology executives and managers, from CIOs and CTOs to service managers and tower owners, chapter one illuminates several important things. First, readers learn that TBM takes a value-based approach, in which the value delivered by a technology or service is framed in terms of:

1)    its total cost, including all retained and soft costs; and

2)    the quality of what we deliver—defined as all the attributes that contribute to the value delivered by it, including functionality, performance, capacity, availability, and security.

 

Second, readers see that, to maximize value, they need a decision-making framework for collaborating with business partners on cost, quality, and business outcomes. This is provided by the TBM Framework, a decision-making methodology that helps technology leaders and their business partners collaborate on optimizing how IT dollars are spent. Relying on transparency in cost, quality, and demand for technology services, the TBM Framework enables key stakeholders to “speak the same language” in determining the tradeoffs needed to optimize run-the-business spending and change-the-business investments.

 

Finally, readers discover the TBM Index, a tool delivered by the TBM Council and Apptio that benchmarks and assesses how technology leaders improve value by applying business acumen to decision making. Following the structure of the TBM Framework, the first-of-its-kind TBM Index employs an interactive survey found in the eBook and through the Council website.

 

In summarizing chapter one, our first management summary provides a high-level overview of TBM and its components. It’s a great tool for helping others get a basic understanding of TBM and the reasons for adopting it in their organizations. We encourage you to download and share this and subsequent summaries with your team and to use them as tools to help articulate your TBM strategy.